How To Get Rid Of Crickets – The Best Home Remedies

The crickets are rare, but the invasion of these insects can be dangerous in the garden and when they are present in small numbers. To eliminate the insects, do not resort directly to pesticides, first, try some ecological methods when you do not know how to get rid of crickets.

Crickets are most attracted to grain and high herbs, but they are not very moody and eat any green herb at hand. When you notice in the garden and dripping leaves appear, you can take some measures that do not involve the dangerous gate.

Eliminating attractive plants for crickets

Herbs before and medium-sized weeds attract most of the crickets. Get rid of weeds and keep the herbs as small as possible. This is only a prevention solution. If you cut grass after the appearance of the first crickets, the process attracts even more.

Plants these to keep the crickets away

Only two plants manage to keep away the crickets when these insects are multiplying. Plant marigolds and unguis (Marrubium vulgare) in the garden to keep the crickets away.

The maximum effect of these plants is obtained when planted as a natural fence around your plants.

Oils that keep the crickets away

Applying spring to plants in the garden, some natural oils repel crickets and can even affect their development. The most effective oil that keeps these insects away is the garlic oil sprayed on plants. Neem oil has an even stronger effect against crickets, but both require regular reapplication.

Natural insecticides

Nosema, parasitic protozoa, have shown their effectiveness in fighting grasshoppers. They can be purchased as natural microbial insecticides such as NoLo Bait or Semaspore and they quickly kill some cricket varieties.

Predators of the crickets

The simplest and most natural way to fight the locusts is birds. Gains and rates can even consume over 800 g of insects a day.

If you do not plan to breed birds for this purpose, you can try to attract birds, such as blackbirds, hammers, and chopsticks.

Image Credits: Old Farmer’s Almanac

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